Posted 6 days ago

octopusheart:

dendropsyche:

sharped0:

clientsfromhell:

Client: I threw out that black pen, it was out of ink.

Me: What black pen?

Client: The one that was lying on your tablet.

Me: You threw out my $150 Wacom pen?

Client: I tried writing with it and it didn’t work. It must’ve been out of ink.

this almost made me cry

this is simultaenously the best and worst submission i’ve ever seen from Clients from Hell.

I feel ill

Posted 1 month ago

kanthara:

krudman:

Why, yes. Yes, I am a character designer that works in the game industry. How could you tell???

THIS SO MUCH THIS I pointed this out in lesstitsnass and it’s so very true. And wrong.
Posted 2 months ago

Just an illustration and a werewolf concept I did a couple of weeks ago. I tend to forget to upload shit here, tbh, I’m still not completely used to it.

Posted 2 months ago

lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago

heliotrooper:

AND HERE WE HAVE MY BIGGEST FUCKING PET PEEVE

(Source: moosekleenex)

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago

worthmeltingforelsa:

In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk
very little yet enjoy a position over those who
offer up their work and their selves to our judgment.
We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write
and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face
is that, in the grand scheme of things, the average
piece of junk is more meaningful than our criticism
designating it so.
But there are times when a critic truly risks something,
and that is in the discovery and defense of the new.
Last night, I experienced something new, an
extraordinary meal from a singularly
unexpected source.
To say that both the meal and its maker have
challenged my preconceptions is a gross
understatement. They have rocked me to
my core. In the past, I have made no secret
of my disdain for Chef Gusteau’s famous motto:
Anyone can cook.
But I realize that only now do I truly understand
what he meant. Not everyone can become
a great artist, but a great artist
can come from anywhere.

It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than
those of the genius now cooking at Gusteau’s,
who is, in this critic’s opinion, nothing less than
the finest chef in France. I will be returning
to Gusteau’s soon, hungry for more

— Anton Ego

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 3 months ago

canis-latrans-thamnos:

Pencil art by Dasha Pliska

the top one… marla?

Posted 3 months ago

kekai-k:

dragonmountain:

Kekai Kotaki?

Yup

Posted 3 months ago

kekai-k:

stereosleeper:

kekai-k:

Guild Wars 2 god statues, with some early progress designs

I knew I recognized these!!

Yup

Posted 3 months ago

samspratt:

"Daenerys" - Illustration by samspratt

Finally finished. Had a little too much fun painting all that loose, whispy, wooshy, hair. Now right back to the art cave to continue research on a poster I’m particularly excited about.

Posted 3 months ago

Concept artwork done by Paul Lasaine & his fellow illustrators for the 1998 DreamWorks film, The Prince of Egypt.

(Source: definitionsfading)